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CCBC Publishing Statistics of Children’s Books by and About People of Color

In 1985, a task to find eligible books for the prestigious Coretta Scott King Book Award for African American authors and illustrators; turned into a mission for for identifying all trade books published each year by and for people of color.

More important, what the low numbers for multicultural literature mean is that publishing for children and teens has a long way to go before reflecting the rich diversity of perspectives and experiences within and across race and culture.

The numbers are far from the only important thing to consider when it comes to multicultural publishing for children and teens, of course. The books themselves matter. And every year we see amazing books by and about people of color and First/Native Nations people published. There just aren’t enough of them. The more books there are, especially books created by authors and Illustrators of color, the more opportunities librarians, teachers, and parents and other adults have of finding outstanding books for young readers and listeners that reflect dimensions of their lives, and give a broader understanding of who we are as a nation.

 

Source: Children’s Books by and About People of Color

People Of Color Accounted For 12 Percent Of Children’s Books Characters In 2016

In 2016, people of color wrote or illustrated fewer than a quarter of new children’s books. Here’s why that matters.

Source: People Of Color Accounted For 22 Percent Of Children’s Books Characters In 2016

Miss Black America continues over-40-year legacy of positivity, volunteerism

Photo Credit: Konrad Jones / Miss Black America Nicole Lynette Hibbert 2016

 

The Miss Black America organization held its first pageant on Atlantic City’s Boardwalk in 1968 on the same night as Miss America, down the street from Boardwalk Hall at The Ritz-Carlton Atlantic City. No one could have imagined the media presence, because few black organizations received such attention from the press at the time.

The next year, 1969, Madison Square Garden Productions televised it.

That year, singer-songwriter and guitarist Curtis Mayfield composed and recorded the first Miss Black America theme song. Since then, hundreds of celebrities have hosted, attended or performed at the contest, including Stevie Wonder and Oprah Winfrey, who competed in 1971.

Source: Miss Black America continues over-40-year legacy of positivity, volunteerism

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